4 ways Edward Shila ‘20 approaches work-life balance!

4 ways Edward Shila ‘20 approaches work-life balance!

Edward Shila ‘20 is an East-African in every sense of the word: he was born in Tanzania to an Ugandan mother and Tanzanian father, he studied in Kenya, he works as the Managing Director of Dentsu Aegis Network in Dar es Salaam and is currently pursuing his MBA in Kigali. 

Most of his time, however, is spent in Tanzania, where he oversees the day to day activities at Dentsu Aegis Network, a global advertising, and marketing agency. “We help brands come up with strategies, communication plans, media plans, digital plans, creatives, production and overall below the line activities.”

As a Managing Director, Edward naturally has a lot on his plate: “A big part of my role is about tracking the financial performance of the business. It’s thinking about how we are performing against the revenue targets that we’ve set for ourselves and offering the team reports on how we will be able to achieve the numbers. Apart from that, it’s also about managing relationships between the business and our clients; whether it’s beer brands or telco’s, we have to make sure that we’re really delivering and the clients are happy.

 

 

Even with all these responsibilities on his plate, Edward still decided to go for his MBA. His reasons were twofold: leadership and growth. “I’ve always been interested in leadership and I wanted something that was going to help me grow in my career. I wanted to move into the C-suite level and most of the places I’ve been interested in require you to have an MBA or at least a Master’s degree. I thought it was the right time for me to go and do that.”

His search for the right MBA, however, took some time:  “I finished my undergrad in 2010 and in these 9 years, it was a struggle to find a school or an MBA programme that was different… until I found ALUSB. I chose ALUSB because it’s a different type of degree or rather, a different type of MBA; from what you’re being taught to how it all weaves together in everyday business operations or leadership and management.

The first thing that really stood out to me was the focus on leadership and building future African leaders. The other thing that stood out to me was the fact that it’s a pan-African MBA. ALUSB gives you the chance to learn and experience other pan-African leaders, expand your network and increase your opportunities.

 

 

How does Edward juggle his roles as father, Managing Director and MBA student? Read on to discover his day-to-day and how he approaches work-life balance!

 

1. Maintain a routine 

This new addition in his life required a little adjusting. To keep everything structured, Edward maintains a strict routine: “Every morning for me starts with trying to get to the office at 6.30 or 7 AM. I start the day by reading the bible, listening to music and I meditate for about half an hour. And that is followed up by me catching up on my studies up until 9 AM. At 9, I start working and checking my emails. By 11 I have a weekly status meeting. The commonality here is that up until 9, it’s routine.”

This routine continues throughout the week. It’s at the beginning of the weekend that Edward gets to change it up a bit: “What my Saturdays look like, all depends on the workload; sometimes I come into work or catch up on assignments. And on lighter days, I spend time with the kids, take them out for dinner, swimming or something else. Sunday is church day. After church, I go back home and I spoil the family.”

 

2. Handle your challenges 

“I’ve always been an optimistic person and I’m very solution-centric. I’m always keen to find a solution to a roadblock and maintain a positive attitude. So whenever there’s a roadblock, I always believe that that is where solutions are supposed to come out of. Being able to do that really helps me to focus on the issue at hand and think about how to move forward.”

 

3. Find your motivation

“There is more that needs to be done and that keeps me going.” 

“Two particular things motivate me to keep going. One is my ambition. Seeing where I come from and where I am today… It is a journey that I’m really proud of. So I keep increasing the bandwidth because I know that I’m not there yet. There is more that needs to be done and that keeps me going. 

Apart from that, my daughters really inspire me. Even though they’re small, they seem to be very wise. After a long day, they are really able to lift my spirits and make me feel motivated and really give me the energy I need for the next day.”

 

4. Make sacrifices 

Work-life balance simply means being able to regulate the amount of time and energy that you spend on your work, yourself and things that are personal to you. How do you split your time between your work, school, your health, and your family and friends, while also doing things that are good for you? For me, I always make it a point to not work during the weekend and I make an effort to go home early and not stay up late. 

It is a challenge, it is hard and it’s quite a lot of work and a lot of effort to try to maintain that. In my case; I’m doing an MBA, I have work, I have a life and this means that the life part has to suffer a little bit for a time for me to be able to complete this. But whenever time permits, I compensate for the times that I wasn’t able to be there.

Christopher Williams: Leaders should be visionaries

Christopher Williams: Leaders should be visionaries

We had the privilege to have a chat with Christopher Williams, African Leadership University President, as he shared his insights on the future of business on the continent, African leadership and the difference between managers and leaders. 
On the future of Africa: All the elements are there.

“All the elements are there. A young population, a growing middle class, a strong interest in development after long periods of economic challenge. It also satisfies a bigger need that the global community has, like I said, to reach new markets. So I think the two coming together promises a lot for Africa.

(…) we now have to be aware that this is an opportunity and this is a moment and this is a window we have to take advantage of. I’m very excited about the role of a school like ALU because it plays exactly in that sweet spot of the expectations, the opportunities, and the demand for Africa’s role in a growing world. So it’s all about the question of how fast we can prepare and how we will embrace technology as part of the solution.”

“… this is an opportunity and this is a moment and this is a window we have to take advantage of.”

 

On his leadership heroes

“(…) But if we bring things closer to home, as we look day by day at people we can relate to more directly, I think the school and the students and faculty should draw inspiration from Fred himself. What Fred has decided to do is not easy. I don’t think too many people growing up aspire… Well, they might aspire to do different things. I think they might aspire to even create companies but not many people aspire to found universities. That is a very complex endeavour and so he chose the difficult one of at least those two choices. And the fact that the faculty and the staff and the students, so early in the life of this institution, have come along on this journey shows that everyone has a little bit more focus and comfort doing something extraordinary.

“… they should be able to look at the environment and look at their companies and look at their countries and look at the world and say: ‘what next?’ or ‘what if?’.”

 

On the difference between leaders and managers.

“Managers live in a functional space and they can manage operationally what needs to be done. Leaders think about a potential or vision or future that doesn’t exist today and they capture it as eloquently as they can and then they make people get excited about it and go after it. So they should be visionaries, they should be able to look at the environment and look at their companies and look at their countries and look at the world and say: ‘what next?’ or ‘what if?’.”

Watch Christopher’s video below:

A WEEK IN THE LIFE OF OLATUNDE IMMANUEL ’20

A WEEK IN THE LIFE OF OLATUNDE IMMANUEL ’20

OLATUNDE IMMANUEL ’20 IS A REGIONAL SALES DIRECTOR FOR WEST AFRICA AT IDEMIA, AN AUGMENTED IDENTITY COMPANY SPECIALIZING IN SECURITY AND IDENTITY SOLUTIONS.

We had a chance to have a chat with Olatunde and discuss how he combines his different roles: father, regional sales director, and ALUSB MBA student. 

Being the Regional Sales Director for West Africa, a lot of Olatunde’s week is spent traveling between his most established markets: Nigeria and Ghana. “Usually, I’m traveling every two weeks. When traveling, I usually leave Lagos on Wednesday morning and try to be back on Saturday morning. Last week, I was in Accra, where we have a lot of customers in the telecommunications industry like Vodafone, MTN, Airtel and Tigo. I meet with them and try to understand what their needs and strategies are in terms of what volume of sim cards they want quarterly and what other technology solutions they are planning to deploy.”

 

His schedule is very flexible, even when he’s working from home. But there is one thing that remains a constant: school runs. “We have two boys and a girl and when I’m not traveling, I always pick up the kids from school. When we get home, I sit with them and make sure they do their assignments while I do my office work.”

 

 

And after the family has gone to bed and it’s quiet, it’s time for Olatunde to do some ALUSB MBA work. His decision to pursue an MBA was mostly career driven. “I wanted to move up in my career and I thought having an MBA programme would provide me with the right tools to realize this.” And Olatunde was right. When he started his MBA journey at ALUSB, he got promoted from Regional Sales Manager to Senior Director. His new goal? Vice President for the whole of Africa. “For me to be able to reach that goal, it’s important for me to understand the African market. I thought an MBA program would allow me to build contacts across the entire continent, not just in West Africa. That is one of the main reasons that I chose the ALU School of Business, because of its pan-African uniqueness. We have good business schools here in Nigeria but they are kind of localized. And I didn’t want to do an MBA in Europe, for example, because the core of my job is in Africa, so I wanted an MBA that I could utilize in the future as I develop myself further on the continent.”

 

“It’s easier to go on a journey with a group of people than to work alone.”

 

When asked about the highlight of his ALUSB MBA journey so far, Olatunde is quick to bring up his classmates. “ I have phenomenal classmates. It’s easier to go on a journey with a group of people than to work alone. My job requires a lot of traveling so having awesome classmates that check up on me and let me know when an assignment is due is very nice. We understand one another and encourage each other. That’s the way we roll!” Even though Olatunde receives a lot of motivation from his classmates, he’s mostly self-motivated.

On doing business in Africa: I have traveled across Africa and I have noticed a few things. One of the things that I think is an issue on the African continent is knowledge of the market sector. I work in the telecommunications and banking sectors, that’s why I wake up to read the news first thing in the morning. I understand my sector and government policies surrounding it, do research and subscribe to journals that I read daily. It would save your life!

Secondly, I think that the networks are also key. The deals I have been able to achieve, are a result of knowing people. Our customers need to know that you’re valuable enough for them to be able to trust you.

Thirdly, when you do business in Africa; give your word, own the promise, deliver and overdeliver.”

 

Joachim Nzuzi ’20 on doing business in Africa and leadership

Joachim Nzuzi ’20 on doing business in Africa and leadership

Joachim Nzuzi ’20 is from the DRC, operates as the CEO at Africa Rising Consulting in Johannesburg and is the Chief Operating Officer at Realbanc Limited in Lagos. It doesn’t get more pan-African than that! With this much experience on the continent, Joachim is the ideal person to talk to about doing business in Africa.

People often say; you don’t choose your career, your career chooses you. And Joachim agrees. “I started looking after peoples assets in South-Africa, I was advising them about investment opportunities and such. And my current business partner, who would often travel to South-Africa, would come and ask me for advice about which area would be best to invest in; in terms of properties. So one thing led to another and then he asked me to come to Nigeria to help him restructure his company. I always had a passion for real-estate. And that’s really how I got into it. So, it’s not as if I chose it, it kind of like chose me more than anything.”

Realising he was growing in his career, Joachim decided that an MBA would be the perfect tool to help him take on these new responsibilities. “I started to identify some gaps and I felt that an MBA was going to give me a better perspective on how to make good managerial decisions.”

About 16 months in his MBA at ALU School of Business, Joachim has no regrets, only lessons. Here are a couple of things that he learned from his vast experience and knowledge of doing business on the continent and his time at ALUSB.

1. Be patient with the continent

Take it easy. I know people say; ‘the higher the risk, the higher the return.’ But you have to be very patient with the continent. You have to take a long-term approach when it comes to doing business in Africa. It’s not going to happen as quickly as you think, but if you stay consistent, things will turn around. There is so much great potential in Africa and I will always say to people: take your time when doing business in Africa and stick to what you know.

“You have to take a long-term approach when it comes to doing business in Africa.”

2. You have to educate yourself

“If you want to do business in Africa, there are just so many factors that you have to take into consideration. Having a local context on different fronts protects a business from risks that could result in considerable losses. I’ve invested money in the DRC and I’ve lost money. Mostly because I was not very in tune with what was going on in the country. So, if you do not know the environment, you’re going to lose money.

There are a lot of things that ALUSB has reaffirmed as far as doing business in Africa is concerned. But the one thing that I learned is to consider all factors. The old me would go into new territory without even thinking. But  ALUSB has taught me the ability to look at things that other people are not looking at. My approach was very limited, but now it’s much broader.”

3. Good leadership is essential

“A lot of things have changed regarding my perception of leadership especially after learning more about the V^3 leadership model at ALUSB. So now, I think a great leader is someone who understands the needs of their people more than anything. And it’s not just about telling people what to do; it’s listening to the needs of the people and finding a way to meet that need. It’s not about you taking the people where you want to go, it’s about taking the people where they need to go. And that is the kind of leadership Africa needs right now.”

It’s not about you taking the people where you want to go, it’s about taking the people where they need to go.”

A Week in the Life of Gloria Karambizi ’20

A Week in the Life of Gloria Karambizi ’20

Gloria Karambizi ’20 is s a Student Loan Manager at Kepler, a nonprofit organisation, where she assists students in getting access to loans and scholarships to pursue higher education.

We had the pleasure of sitting down with her and discovering how she balances her roles as a Manager and an MBA student while also making time for friends and family.

Gloria’s week starts with a twenty-minute drive to work at 9 a.m. She emphasises that a twenty-minute commute is a lot in a Rwandan context as there is not much traffic or the roads. Her days in the office depend on the plans of the organisation. Currently, Kepler is getting ready to enrol new students to the programme. As a result, her priority is planning in preparation for the incoming batch of new students.

Her primary focus is on creating an efficient system, given that the organisation is working on a relatively new programme. She hopes that through collaboration with different stakeholders, she can develop a replicable process within the programme that can be used in the future.

On most weekdays after work, she meets up with some of her ALUSB classmates. During those meetups, they catch up on schoolwork, keep each other accountable and act as a support system for their academics, work, and personal lives. Notably, she likes to spend Friday evenings at career events and professionals’ meetings that happen around Kigali. She considers these events a great opportunity to network and interacts with other professionals, especially those within her line of work.

“My classmates and the ALUSB community are phenomenal; I get inspired by them every day.”

Weekends are family-time for Gloria. She values spending time with her family and consequently ensures she makes time for them every week. They spend time cooking together on Saturday, go to church together on Sunday, and watch a movie afterwards.

On motivation: “I am glad that I’m doing something that is already bringing change to the continent. This motivates me to wake up because I know what I do matters and that I am helping other people.” Gloria credits her motivation to the fact that she is doing what she loves. She is driven by the desire to help people and impact peoples lives positively and works towards this every day. Gloria also genuinely likes the ALUSB MBA courses: “The Leadership Lab course has been instrumental in making leadership practical in my day-to-day activities. Through this course, I have been able to apply myself as a leader in different spaces.”

“I now see myself as a leader.”

Finding work-life balance: Gloria credits her work-ethic as the foundation of her being able to balance the different roles and responsibilities in her life. She keeps a 9 to 5 policy which gives her room to spend time with family, friends and work for school. “It’s not an easy process, but it is one that gets easier with time and patience.”

On teamwork at ALUSB: “You have to plan accordingly, and you should do this earlier on,” Gloria advises. To have efficient group work, team members must plan early on the dynamics of their team. Through early planning, Gloria has been able to work efficiently within a pan-African team.

Advice to prospective students: “Students should ensure they stay up to date with course content and assignments to avoid a build-up of workload.” She also highlights her classmates as one of the critical assets one will gain in the rigorous MBA programme. “Your classmates will be your family.” she declares.

Meet our MBA Class of 2021 Chairman’s Scholars

Meet our MBA Class of 2021 Chairman’s Scholars

ALU School of Business is delighted to announce our newest Chairman’s Scholars, two remarkable African professionals who are joining the October 2019 MBA programme.

Our two new Chairman’s Scholars were chosen on the basis of their outstanding professional achievements, their pan-African vision and their demonstrated leadership in uplifting their communities. Join us in congratulating Tafadzwa Bete Sasa and Brian Kudzaishe Mataruka!

Tafadzwa Bete Sasa

Tafadzwa Bete Sasa is a high-performance trainer, consultant and coach in Lusaka, Zambia, specialising in designing and facilitating the knowledge, tools, systems and processes that equip individuals and teams for higher productivity

The founder of GoalGetter Consultancy, Tafadzwa coaches high potential professionals on personal mastery and goal setting for accelerated career and personal growth. She trains and consults for entrepreneurs and SMEs on team building, organisational design and staff engagement for higher efficiency. She’s also a founding partner of the Training Leaders Consortium, a partnership of Learning and Development professionals who are helping corporates across five sectors to optimize their organisational cultures and processes to drive productivity and growth. 

Tafadzwa took her first steps into the world of HR at BancABC Zimbabwe and later worked as a team-building facilitator at Kutting Edge Solutions, where she discovered and fell in love with experiential learning facilitation. As the Training and Resource Centre Manager at Alchemy Women in Leadership Zambia, she refined her facilitation, team leadership and project management skills on a leadership development project that connected three generations of women and girls into mentorship villages. 

Tafadzwa is the this year’s National President of JCI Zambia, a global network providing development opportunities that empower young people to create positive change. She is also a Global Shaper under an initiative of the World Economic Forum for Hubs developed and led by young people driving dialogue, action and change in their communities. For her outstanding work and leadership, Tafadzwa has received leadership awards including being recognised by Moremi Initiative as one of Africa’s most outstanding Emerging Women Leaders.

 

Brian Kudzaishe Mataruka

Brian Kudzaishe Mataruka is a practising lawyer based in Harare, Zimbabwe and a partner with a leading Harare law firm, Gill Godlonton & Gerrans, where he also heads the Insolvency and Mining departments. His key areas of speciality are in matters of insolvency, mining, infrastructure and deal structuring. He is also a non-executive Director of Willdale Bricks Limited, the only brick manufacturing company listed on the Zimbabwe stock exchange and sits on boards of various leading private limited companies such as Aviation Ground Services (Private) Limited.

A leading entrepreneur in his own right, Brian is one of the founding directors of an agricultural export company called Umhlaba Green Fields (Private) Limited which exports horticultural agricultural produce to Europe. He is also the founding Director of a construction company called Umuzi Properties which specialises in low to medium scale housing in Zimbabwe and has built over a hundred homes since its inception in July 2017.  

Through these companies, Brian is directly involved in the employment of more than one hundred employees fending for more than 300 dependants. Brian has previously been voted as personality of the month by a leading Zimbabwean lifestyle magazine and is regarded as a proponent of social change in Zimbabwe and as one of the leading development entrepreneurs in the Sub-Saharan region.