Meet our MBA Class of 2021 Chairman’s Scholars

Meet our MBA Class of 2021 Chairman’s Scholars

ALU School of Business is delighted to announce our newest Chairman’s Scholars, two remarkable African professionals who are joining the October 2019 MBA programme.

Our two new Chairman’s Scholars were chosen on the basis of their outstanding professional achievements, their pan-African vision and their demonstrated leadership in uplifting their communities. Join us in congratulating Tafadzwa Bete Sasa and Brian Kudzaishe Mataruka!

Tafadzwa Bete Sasa

Tafadzwa Bete Sasa is a high-performance trainer, consultant and coach in Lusaka, Zambia, specialising in designing and facilitating the knowledge, tools, systems and processes that equip individuals and teams for higher productivity

The founder of GoalGetter Consultancy, Tafadzwa coaches high potential professionals on personal mastery and goal setting for accelerated career and personal growth. She trains and consults for entrepreneurs and SMEs on team building, organisational design and staff engagement for higher efficiency. She’s also a founding partner of the Training Leaders Consortium, a partnership of Learning and Development professionals who are helping corporates across five sectors to optimize their organisational cultures and processes to drive productivity and growth. 

Tafadzwa took her first steps into the world of HR at BancABC Zimbabwe and later worked as a team-building facilitator at Kutting Edge Solutions, where she discovered and fell in love with experiential learning facilitation. As the Training and Resource Centre Manager at Alchemy Women in Leadership Zambia, she refined her facilitation, team leadership and project management skills on a leadership development project that connected three generations of women and girls into mentorship villages. 

Tafadzwa is the this year’s National President of JCI Zambia, a global network providing development opportunities that empower young people to create positive change. She is also a Global Shaper under an initiative of the World Economic Forum for Hubs developed and led by young people driving dialogue, action and change in their communities. For her outstanding work and leadership, Tafadzwa has received leadership awards including being recognised by Moremi Initiative as one of Africa’s most outstanding Emerging Women Leaders.

 

Brian Kudzaishe Mataruka

Brian Kudzaishe Mataruka is a practising lawyer based in Harare, Zimbabwe and a partner with a leading Harare law firm, Gill Godlonton & Gerrans, where he also heads the Insolvency and Mining departments. His key areas of speciality are in matters of insolvency, mining, infrastructure and deal structuring. He is also a non-executive Director of Willdale Bricks Limited, the only brick manufacturing company listed on the Zimbabwe stock exchange and sits on boards of various leading private limited companies such as Aviation Ground Services (Private) Limited.

A leading entrepreneur in his own right, Brian is one of the founding directors of an agricultural export company called Umhlaba Green Fields (Private) Limited which exports horticultural agricultural produce to Europe. He is also the founding Director of a construction company called Umuzi Properties which specialises in low to medium scale housing in Zimbabwe and has built over a hundred homes since its inception in July 2017.  

Through these companies, Brian is directly involved in the employment of more than one hundred employees fending for more than 300 dependants. Brian has previously been voted as personality of the month by a leading Zimbabwean lifestyle magazine and is regarded as a proponent of social change in Zimbabwe and as one of the leading development entrepreneurs in the Sub-Saharan region. 

 

On delivering social impact beyond the workspace with Demilade Oluwasina ‘20

On delivering social impact beyond the workspace with Demilade Oluwasina ‘20

Here at ALU School of Business, we believe that entrepreneurial ventures play a vital role in Africa’s development. We actively encourage ALUSB students to explore entrepreneurship through courses like E&I, the Lion’s Den event and even through the V^3 Leadership Model, which has entrepreneurial elements at its core! 

Demilade Oluwasina ‘20 is someone that needed no introduction to the entrepreneurial spirit. Demie, as he’s more commonly referred to, is currently an ALU Rwanda Faculty member for Entrepreneurial Leadership and acts as the support for the design and delivery of other programmes including the Global Challenges Degree. His role at ALU is a testament to his passion for entrepreneurship and education. He is also a believer of lifelong learning – hence his decision to embark on an MBA journey with ALU School of Business.

He pursued this MBA with the hopes of achieving 3 things: new skills, great relationships and a broader perspective for impact. “I wanted to gain new skills through going through content, reflecting on that content and incorporating it in my daily work life and other projects. Secondly, I wanted to build great and lasting relationships that enable me to tap into even more resources with the diversity of colleagues, partners, and others in the ecosystem. And lastly, a broader perspective through conversations with the people and the different issues we discuss in class. These 3 things, I believe, will empower me to be a better leader and a change-maker with greater impact.”

At ALU Rwanda, he is known for being an enthusiastic faculty member who has played a huge role in mentoring students with different enterprises within the ALU space as well as supporting Global Challenges students in formulating value-oriented missions. But Demie often goes beyond his job description and his workspace to deliver social impact.

One example of this is his project with the EDD, a Rwandan organization that works to rehabilitate and empower street children. “I got involved with them through some of my colleagues at ALUSB During BUILD Lab.” The ALUSB MBA BUILD Lab is a 24-hour design challenge where students are paired with local partners in order to contribute to the optimization of their businesses while also learning important leadership, innovation, and teamwork skills. Through this process, ALUSB MBA students are able to identify some key problems and solutions to address them. 

“One of the biggest issues that EDD had, was the struggle to articulate a strong brand and marketing strategy in order to keep attracting the right kinds of shareholders, support and more to be sustainable. I have years of experience in design, branding, advertising and publishing. My friends asked if I was willing to help with the project and I decided to take it on.

“I saw that EDD’s work was needed and was indeed transformative and I wanted to be part of helping them reach their goals, succeed and be sustainable as an organization.” 

Demie is currently working on a strategy that will attract support and the right stakeholders to make the EDD a sustainable organization. At the same, he gets to be part of a programme that is empowering young children in Rwanda by providing them with a community that is supportive and concerned about their welfare.

Nelly Wainaina ’20: The journey of leadership does not stop

Nelly Wainaina ’20: The journey of leadership does not stop

As the Stills Portfolio Lead and Head of Marketing for Kenya and Tanzania Country Operations at Coca-Cola, Nelly Wainaina ’20 is no stranger to leadership. Still, her time as an MBA student at ALU School of Business revealed some leadership aspects that she had yet uncovered. Watch the video below to learn more about other discoveries she made at ALUSB and her advice to young, African businesswomen.
On the V^3 Leadership Model
(…) It’s a programme that sort of unpacks you, like almost disintegrates the type of person you are; your leadership skills, your qualities and then puts you back together. And I find that absolutely brilliant because the journey of leadership does not stop. Many of us joined the programme when we thought: ‘I’m at the apex of my career, I’ve got lots of experiences, I’ve got a lot to teach,…’ But to be honest, there’s been a lot of unlearning and you have to do, you have to be receptive to the learning process so that you can learn and then transform. And I tell you, it’s been absolutely amazing.
To young businesswomen on the continent
Yes, women are different from male leaders but if you go into business with the notion of ‘I’m a different person than the other one’, then you already shortchange yourself. And I would advise women to play the game just like anybody else would, to believe in themselves. And once you believe in yourself, you become more confident and then opportunities start opening themselves up just like the rest of your male counterparts. So I don’t think there’s a difference in terms of skills for both men and women. It’s just if you present yourself as a ready person for the opportunity, you’ll absolutely be successful. So just believe in yourself and be confident in your choices.
Watch Nelly’s full interview below:

Sudan Bukra: An innovative solution to freedom of speech in Sudan.

Sudan Bukra: An innovative solution to freedom of speech in Sudan.

We were graced with the opportunity to chat with Mutwakil Abdul Mageid 20’ to learn more about the outstanding work that he and his colleagues are involved in with Sudan Bukra- an innovative solution to freedom of speech in Sudan.

Sudan has been through some major political changes in the past months. A fight for democracy, a change in leadership, a massacre of over 120 lives, and a  nationwide Internet shutdown, which silenced protesters and left millions of Sudanese people without access to information, e-commerce and the ability to communicate with the rest of the world. It was at this point that a group of Sudanese professionals, including Mutwakil Abdul Mageid ‘20, decided to take action and start Sudan Bukra, a free-to-air, crowd-sourced and crowd-funded broadcasting channel that provides civic education to the Sudanese community.

Mutwakil Abdul Mageid is a key account manager for Ericsson, currently managing MTN accounts in Sudan, South Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda, Zambia, and Eswatini. He is also a Class of 2020 ALUSB MBA student.

In describing what led him to ALU School of Business (ALUSB), Mutwakil says,

“I was in pursuit of an MBA that is relevant to my inspiration as well as my big-picture plans – an MBA that is relevant to Africa. I did not know this existed until I came across the ALUSB MBA programme, which focuses on doing business in Africa and on leadership – the two main things that I was looking for!”

Could you share with us some context on the events that took place leading up to the internet shutdown?

 

“On 19 December 2018, the people of Sudan started a movement of ‘Freedom, Peace, and Justice’, seeking political change from a thirty-year regime of dictatorship. After months of protests and demonstrations, Sudan was able to remove Omar Bashir from power, along with his regime, but only for the minister of defence to take over. 

This resulted in the people of Sudan returning to the streets. On  6 April 2019, they rallied in front of the military headquarters and vowed not to move until the execution of the declaration of freedom. A declaration was signed by all parties and civil societies asking for a democratic transformation. Two months later, the military took over power and suddenly there was a massacre at the sit-in area in Khartoum, resulting in the loss of over 120 lives, which was quickly followed by a total internet shutdown the following day. The main purpose of the shutdown was to cover up on-going violence and silence protestors. There was also a blackout, aimed at dispersing the protestors from the sit-in area.”

 Protestors using their mobile phone lights at the sit-in area, Khartoum

What is the story behind the Sudan Bukra?

“Sudan Bukra means Sudan Tomorrow. Based on a contextual meaning of the Arabic word “Bukra”, it alludes to hope and optimism.

We named this project Sudan Bukra to communicate a message of hope for the future of Sudan.”

Mutwakil continues, “Based on how dictatorship works, my colleagues and I knew that the people in power would try to cut off social media since it’s something that they can’t control. We wanted to find a means by which the people of Sudan could still reach out to each other using a combination of traditional media (Television) and content from social media. We came up with the Sudan Burka TV channel as a solution for the freedom of speech. We receive information from the ground, transform it into content for TV and broadcast it. At the same time, we use it as a means to communicate the progress of negotiations, as well as details about the demonstration schedules as organised by the Sudanese Professionals Association (SPA)”.

Given the risks that you face, what drives you to continue your work with Sudan Burka?

 

“The main thing that keeps us going is the hope that we have for Sudan. We want the best for the people of Sudan and we believe that having access to information is a way to build our country”, explains Mutwakil.

Sudan Bukra has already reached millions of people, a fact that was confirmed when over 4 million people attended a demonstration organised by the SPA and broadcasted through their platform. It is a pillar of hope and a testament to the resilience of the Sudanese people. 

Mutwakil states that he and his colleagues hope that Sudan Bukra will continue to be a platform of civic education for the people of Sudan beyond the current political climate. He envisions a Sudan where the people are informed about democracy and good leadership, leading to the overall transformation of Sudan

“Do not focus on who will solve the problem, but focus on how the problem will be solved,” Mutwakil Abdul Mageid ‘20.

A true leader for the African Century, we are proud to have Mutwakil as part of our student body and are eager to see the transformation that he and his colleagues will help bring about through Sudan Bukra. Through Mutwakil, we are reminded that leadership is not a position we occupy, but an attitude and a lifestyle of service, vision, and purpose.

 

Diana Kizza ’20: We owe it to our continent to dream big

Diana Kizza ’20: We owe it to our continent to dream big

Diana Kizza ’20 describes herself as an economic catalyst with a passion for healthcare. She is currently a Senior Programme Manager at the Clinton Health Access, where she is managing a programme on Sustainable Health Financing. Watch the video interview below to learn more about Diana’s decision to pursue an MBA at ALUSB and how her journey has been so far.
“…we need to remember and learn or relearn to dream big for Africa. We owe it to our continent to dream big despite the challenges that we’ve seen, despite the pain and the tears. There’s no better time than now.”
What led you to ALU School Of Business? 
“I didn’t want to go back abroad because everything that I learnt abroad was only applicable abroad and not really in Africa. It hit all the right buttons. So you meet all the right people; people who work in Africa and are excited and passionate about changing Africa. You meet people who have the skills and the networks to help you link to who you need to go to, to get answers and help and support. And for me, those are two really big things. And third; the leadership component. Because I believed that there was something in me. I needed to find a way to get it out, but I couldn’t find where to get it out from. But reading the ALUSB course content and just reading through the profiles of students that have been here before, I realised this is the perfect place to gain those kinds of skills.
How would you describe your ALUSB experience so far? 
“It was very disruptive because you have this way of life. You think that you’re moving along a certain path and all of a sudden you’re hit by a bolt of lightning and you realise that you can do more, it’s you who’s limiting yourself. You see the challenges all around you and I’ve learned through this programme that those challenges are opportunities that you need to recognise. We hear about Mo Ibrahim, we see Kagame at the first graduation ceremony of ALUSB. I think what that brought for us is that, you know, despite our background, despite what has happened in our past, we need to remember and learn or relearn to dream big for Africa. We owe it to our continent to dream big despite the challenges that we’ve seen, despite the pain and the tears. There’s no better time than now.
Watch Diana’s full video interview here: